Follow the DAPA blog via RSS Get DAPA Blog updates via Email Follow DAPA on Twitter

Linking Farmers to Markets

Building Foundations: LINK Methodology Implementation in Haiti

Apr 1st, 2014 | By
Catholic Relief Services meets with CIAT’s Alexandra Amrein in Les Cayes, Haiti.

Catholic Relief Services meets with CIAT’s Alexandra Amrein in Les Cayes, Haiti.

From March 11 to 13, CIAT’s Alexandra Amrein, visiting researcher with DAPA’s Linking Farmers to Markets team, traveled to Les Cayes, Haiti to conduct a training workshop on LINK Methodology. The tool, which was developed by CIAT to design, implement and evaluate inclusive business relationships, has so far been applied in different regions, including Nicaragua, Peru, Colombia, Ecuador and Ethiopia.  This particular workshop aimed to familiarize and train Catholic Relief Services staff located in Haiti.

Goals of the workshop included:

  1. Present LINK’s theory of change
  2. Train CRS staff on the LINK Methodology
  3. Identify specific cases to apply LINK
  4. Develop a work plan for the implementation of LINK
  5. Define participation in Central American Learning Alliance

Over the duration of the workshop, Alexandra led participants through LINK’s four tools:

  1. Tool 1: The value chain map
  2. Tool 2: The business model canvas
  3. Tool 3: The New Business Model Principles
  4. Tool 4: The prototype cycle

These four tools are vital to unlocking and understanding the links that arise between smallholder producers and formal markets. Even though 85 percent of the world’s farms are managed by small-scale producers, agribusiness largely ignores this, instead focusing development resources on large-scale suppliers and excluding smaller scale actors from modern channels. This leads to an increased perception of high risks and costs associated with purchasing from multiple and dispersed producers, when such risks and costs are actually quite manageable if adequate approaches are used to close the gap between the opposing views of agribusiness and smallholder farmers. Such a convergence requires adapted practices that govern the relationship between sellers and buyer. LINK Methodology suggests a set of six principles for inclusive trading relationships:

  1. Collaboration between actors
  2. Effective markets linkages
  3. Fair and transparent governance
  4. Equitable access to services
  5. Inclusive innovation
  6. Measuring of results

By strengthening farmer’s skills and capacities to become better business partners, while integrating private sector actors in the process to promote transparency and an enabling environment, capable farmers and willing buyers can establish both durable and profitable trading relationships. With the help of CIAT, Catholic Relief Services can adapt LINK Methodology and indicators to best suit their goals and situation.

LINK Methodology has the potential to be applied with the help of Catholic Relief Services in Haiti in the coffee, mango and corn industries, adding on to a previous project led by CIAT’s Linking Farmer to Markets team in Haiti in which a profound study of the mango and coffee value chains was conducted.

In the future, CIAT’s Linking Farmers to Markets team aims to more closely collaborate with actors in Haiti. The inclusion of CRS Haiti in the Central American Learning Alliance could be a first step towards building this relationship.

In addition to local Catholic Relief Services staff, the workshop participants included actors from local mango (ASPEF) and coffee (COCAC) organizations as well as representatives of the Agricultural Trade Department (DDAS) and a local development organization (DCCH).

The Methodology is available both in English (Download English version) and Spanish (Download Spanish Version).We invite you to help us test this version in the field to adapt and improve the tool. If you would like to implement our methodology we strongly encourage you to contact us in order to explore how CIAT can engage with you organization. For input or feedback, please use our feedback form.

 

Related Articles:

LINKing Smallholders: A guide on inclusive business models

LINK Methodology among Top Picks 2012

VECO Andino implementará la metodología LINK

Collaboration for Inclusiveness: Learning Alliances in Central America



Collaboration for Inclusiveness: Learning Alliances in Central America

Mar 20th, 2014 | By
February 6 – 7 Managua: New business models: Constructing inclusive commercial links between small-scale buyers and producers in Central America

February 6 – 7 Managua: New business models: Constructing inclusive commercial links between small-scale buyers and producers in Central America

From February 6 to 7, the Regional Learning Alliance of Central America (Alianza de Aprendizaje de Centroámerica), an initiative promoted by CIAT since 2003, met for the second installment of the one year 2013 – 2014 learning cycle in Managua, Nicaragua. The learning cycle’s topic, “New business models: Constructing inclusive commercial links between small-scale buyers and producers in Central America,” was central to the workshop, where participants built upon the September 23 – 26, 2013 meeting, also held in Managua. Participants continued to practice Learning Alliance methodology, which initially emerged due to a clear need for increased collaboration between research and development organizations.

Learning Alliances

Somewhere between the realms of research and development lies current field reality.[i] Organizations like the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) have attempted to close this gap by functioning as a bridge between upstream academic research and downstream development users.[ii] Starting in 2003, a group of actors in Central America, including International and local NGOs, an international agricultural research center, a national university and the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) joined forces to explore how they could improve the links between research and development actors. The chosen thematic focus was rural enterprise development.

The Learning Alliances approach, implemented extensively in Central America and 35 additional countries globally by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) and Catholic Relief Services (CRS), is an exemplary demonstration of how agricultural research organizations such as CIAT collaborate with development practitioners to jointly embrace learning as a tool to improve practice. By integrating cross-cutting activities on knowledge management and capacity development, the resulting data feeds improved capabilities, technologies and approaches – contributing directly to published articles and insights for policy-level dialog.[iii] The key principles of Learning Alliances are:

  • Create clear objectives
  • Promote shared responsibilities, costs and credit
  • Outputs as inputs
  • Utilize differentiated learning mechanisms
  • Foster long-term, trust-based relationships
The learning cycle.

The learning cycle.

Since the initiative’s launch in 2003, evidence shows improved connectivity between organizations working on similar topics, better access to information and knowledge on rural enterprise development and access to improved methods and tools. Attitudes have shifted from competition to collaboration, leading to increased effectiveness in existing projects and more strategic new projects. The learning alliance has worked with a total of 25 direct partner agencies, influencing over 116 additional organizations, contributing to change among 33,000 rural families in Honduras, Nicaragua, Guatemala and El Salvador.

2013 – 2014 Learning Cycles

The first meeting that took place in September 2013, where the CIAT Linking Farmers to Markets team facilitated a regional workshop. Participants worked to build a common understanding and language in order to promote the horizontal learning process. The three-day workshop produced several valuable steps in the right direction, which were revisited in this second workshop. Developments from the September workshop included:

  1. Designing a theory of change and common monitoring framework;
  2. Training on LINK Methodology;
  3. Identification of specific cases to test, adapt and improve LINK;
  4. Elaboration of work plans and supervision for the duration of the learning cycle;
  5. Budget of revision so as to co-finance specific activities for associates.
The double-loop learning cycle in a learning alliance.

The double-loop learning cycle in a learning alliance.

The aim of the current learning cycle, funded by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), is two-fold:

  1. To improve regional capacity in Central America in evaluating, designing and optimizing business models in order to generate sustainable benefits for small-scale farmers.
  2. To test and adapt the LINK Methodology to the regional needs of Central America, as well as building a set of regional empirical data, case studies and lessons learned that connect key actors in rural development.
LINK Methodology.

LINK Methodology.

Workshop 2: Maintaining Momentum

The workshop was guided by CIAT‘s Linking Farmers to Markets team, and includes 12 representatives of four partner organizations of the Central American Learning Alliance:

The 2013 – 2014 learning cycle is focused on utilizing LINK Methodology to assess the state of current business models between a seller (who may be a first, second or third tier producer organization, either association, cooperative or informal group) and a buyer (which can be an intermediary, retailer or wholesaler) and aims to jointly develop more inclusive business models leading to measurable changes for producers and buyers in Central America.

With such productive strides made in September, participants returned in February to reflect on the advances made with LINK, focusing on Tool #4: Prototype Cycle.

The Prototype Cycle.

The Prototype Cycle.

The first day began with a review of progress made and a group discussion of how LINK’s application in various situations was proceeding. Participants then reviewed LINK’s third tool, the Prototype Cycle, the goal of which is to design, test and continually evaluate the business model in order to constantly improve it. Key questions include:

  1. Where is our business model today?
  2. Where do we want to find our business model in the future?
  3. What has to change?
  4. How can we implement improvements and how do we measure them?
  5. What improvements work and don’t work, and how can we improve upon that?

Some suggestions rose during the afternoon discussion on possible improvements to be made on the Prototype Cycle, including:

  1. Increased follow-up and long-distance support to evaluate advances made among other participants;
  2. Propose more concrete definitions of indicators in order to monitor the prototype cycle;
  3. Seek to be pragmatic and simple.
6

Participants posted feedback on the Learning Alliance workshop and Prototype Cycle tool.

The second day of the workshop continued reviewing and working with LINK’s fourth tool, followed by planning sessions for the next phase of the Learning Cycle.  Participants then engaged in an evaluation of the workshop as a whole.

The next step in the Learning Cycle is to continue applying the methodology in the field stepping into the prototype cycle. CIAT will engage in field visits to select project sites, followed by a writing workshop in September to document cases and reflect upon shared experiences.

Looking forward, the future of the Learning Alliance methodology is bright. Despite successes, there are important areas for further work which builds on gains made until now. Such areas include sustainable pro-poor value chains, information and knowledge management for innovation and increasing linkages to multi-stakeholder spaces and networks to influence attitudes and practices in the private sector, donor agencies and state agencies.[i] Efforts need to be made to develop effective linkages between the alliance and other key actors to leverage field based learning to influence private firms, donor agencies and state agencies. Identifying how to develop forays into the private sector more systemically is a critical area for future work.

Related Links

Designing inclusive business models in Central America

Further Reading

CIAT. “Diversified livelihoods through effective agro-enterprise interventions: Creating a cumulative learning framework.” 7 September 2013.

Lundy, Mark. “Integrating research, development and learning to improve the livelihoods of the rural poor in LAC.”

Lundy, Mark. “Change through shared learning.” September 2006.


[1] Lundy, Mark. “Integrating research, development and learning to improve the livelihoods of the rural poor in LAC.”

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ibid.

[4] CIAT. “Diversified livelihoods through effective agro-enterprise interventions: Creating a cumulative learning framework.” 7 September 2013.



Buscamos estudiantes de maestría o profesionales con experiencia social relevante

Feb 25th, 2014 | By

Foto: Neil Palmer (CIAT)

El Proyecto de Apoyo a Alianzas Productivas (PAAP) es una apuesta del Ministerio de Agricultura y Desarrollo Rural (MADR) que viene implementándose desde 2002 con el fin de incrementar la competitividad y el desarrollo empresarial de las comunidades rurales, de manera sostenible a través de alianzas productivas entre grupos organizados de pequeños productores y comercializadores o transformadores de su producto.

El Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT) es uno de 15 centros financiados principalmente por 64 países, fundaciones privadas y organizaciones internacionales que constituyen el Grupo Consultivo para la Investigación Agrícola Internacional (CGIAR, por sus siglas en inglés). Nuestra misión es reducir el hambre y la pobreza y mejorar la salud humana en los trópicos mediante una investigación que aumente la eco-eficiencia de la agricultura. En la actualidad, el Centro desarrolla proyectos de investigación en 16 países y la sede principal está ubicada en Palmira, Valle del Cauca, Colombia.

Desde 20013 existe una iniciativa conjunta entre el MADR-PAAP y el CIAT que busca documentar y analizar el funcionamiento y los resultados del Programa de Apoyo a las Alianzas Productivas (PAAP). El CIAT, en su papel de coordinador-ejecutor, documentará y analizará en varios niveles el funcionamiento y los resultados del PAAP como motor de procesos de desarrollo económico y social incluyentes con poblaciones vulnerables. Se identificarán, con base en los criterios desarrollados en el marco del proyecto, algunas alianzas como unidad de análisis, y se indagará por medio de  talleres, entrevistas semiestructuradas y encuestas, sobre el modelo empresarial implementado en cada una de esas alianzas; además de analizar el grado de inclusión, los cambios más significativos y las lecciones aprendidas. Igualmente,  se realizará una caracterización socioeconómica del hogar de los participantes de las alianzas seleccionadas.

Para  recopilar la información mencionada, el MADR-PAAP y el CIAT buscan tres estudiantes de maestría o profesionales con experiencia relevante en la aplicación de métodos de investigación social y trabajo con actores rurales, para la posición de Gestor de Evidencia Empírica, quienes serán responsables de aplicar en campo un kit de herramientas cualitativas y cuantitativas (entre ellas las entrevistas semi-estructuradas y encuestas) brindado por las áreas de Vinculando Productores al Mercado y Evaluación de Impacto del CIAT y, posteriormente, documentar un estudio de caso con los resultados obtenidos y la información secundaria recopilada.

Los(as) Gestores de evidencia empírica van a trabajar en equipos de dos y van a estar basados la mayoría del tiempo en las zonas rurales donde se encuentran los casos de estudio, que incluyen: Arauca, Atlántico, Bolívar, Caldas, Caquetá, Córdoba, Cauca,  Risaralda y Sucre.

Se prefieren personas con origen  y/o residencia en la zona de trabajo.

Disponibilidad de tiempo: de marzo a julio de 2014

 

Perfil del aspirante

  • Profesionales con pregrado con mínimo dos (2) años de experiencia relevante en las áreas solicitadas (revisar los dos ítems siguientes) o estudiantes de maestría en economía, administración de empresas, sociología, comunicación social, agronomía, agroindustria o disciplinas afines, que hayan terminado sus clases y cumplan con el resto del Perfil.
  • Experiencia de trabajo con actores rurales (productores, compradores, ONG, entre otros).
  • Experiencia en la aplicación de métodos de investigación social como entrevistas semi –estructuradas, encuestas y grupos focales.
  • Interés en temas de agricultura y desarrollo empresarial.
  • Excelente redacción, capacidad de análisis y síntesis.
  • Manejo de paquete Office.
  • Disposición para aprender e involucrarse en temas nuevos.
  • Disponibilidad de tiempo completo.
  • Disponibilidad para viajar y realizar trabajo en campo.
  • Facilidad para trabajar en equipo y comprometerse con propósitos grupales.
  • Capacidad de trabajar bajo presión de tiempo.
  • Ser muy cumplido con las fechas de entrega.
  • Ser capaz de trabajar de forma autónoma.

El aspirante debe cumplir ciento por ciento con este perfil. No serán tenidos en cuenta los perfiles que no cumplan completamente con todos los requisitos mencionados anteriormente.

Roles y responsabilidades

  • Revisión de antecedentes del caso de estudio.
  • Aprender en teoría y práctica sobre herramientas participativas para analizar modelos de negocios, como la Metodología LINK[1].
  • Coordinar fechas de entrevista con las personas clave del estudio de caso, según el cronograma.
  • Organizar viajes a campo.
  • Realizar entrevistas semi – estructuradas y encuestas.
  • Planificar, organizar y manejar grupos focales.
  • Establecer comunicación permanente con el equipo del MADR-PAAP y CIAT.
  • Entregar los datos recopilados del estudio de caso  de manera “cruda”; y de forma organizada, a través de un informe final sobre el trabajo realizado, que también deberá incluir lecciones aprendidas a través de la experiencia en campo, además de los resultados sistematizados de las encuestas (nivel micro).

Términos de contratación

La contratación será realizada por el MADR, a través de la modalidad de prestación de servicios.

Aplicaciones

Las aplicaciones (Hoja de Vida) deben enviarse vía e-mail a Jhon Jairo Hurtado: j.hurtado@cgiar.org

 

Fecha de cierre*: viernes 28 de febrero – 10:00 a.m. Colombia

*En vista de la gran acogida que ha tenido esta convocatoria, la fecha de cierre se adelantará para el viernes 28 de febrero, hasta las 10:00 a.m. en Colombia. Agradecemos a todos aquellos que enviaron sus hojas de vida para ocupar esta posición. 

[1] http://dapa.ciat.cgiar.org/metodologias-para-lograr-vinculos-de-mercado-efectivos/



Sowing the seeds of research into policy

Jan 9th, 2014 | By
M. Mitchell/IFPRI

M. Mitchell/IFPRI

From November 18 to 20, more than 50 experts in policy, research and agricultural science met at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in in Washington, DC. The event was co-sponsored by the CGIAR’s Research Programs on Policies, Institutions and Markets (PIM) and Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH), both led by IFPRI.

The conference brought together participants conducting the most innovative and forward-thinking work in nutrition, natural resource management, health and agriculture. Attendees engaged in meaningful conversation, working towards creating concrete action points. Participants discussed how research can generate policy-relevant evidence, and how to make sure that said policy is actually integrated into effective programs.

Representing the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) were two members of the Linking Farmers to Markets initiative in the Decision and Policy Analysis (DAPA) Research Program. Senior Researcher Mark Lundy and policy analyst Rafael Isidro Parra-Peña attended the conference, presenting findings from a recently completed Ford Foundation funded initiative investigating the effectiveness of policy on rural agriculture productivity, connectivity and competitiveness.

Parra-Peña presented a case study on the Colombian supply chain system, with additional micro-level research discussing the tomato supply chain in Boyacá. You can view the presentation, along with Parra-Peña’s commentary, here.

The workshop aims to develop flagship guidance via a toolkit/guide on how to understand policy processes to connect research to policy. Other goals include publishing working papers and possibly special issue of a journal, in addition to fostering an ever-growing community of practice for sharing ideas and approaches.

For links to the complete set of presentations, including an agenda and further reading material, please visit IFPRI’s event wrap-up blog post.



ACORDAR: grandes dimensiones, grandes aprendizajes

Dec 18th, 2013 | By

Por Erika Eliana Mosquera, Mark Lundy y Jhon Jairo Hurtado

Una relación colaborativa que ha dado muchos frutos desde el año 2003 es la que existe entre Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Nicaragua y el Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT). A través de esta relación se han aplicado, en diferentes contextos y tiempos, las distintas metodologías ofrecidas por Linking Farmers to Markets (LFM) para lograr vínculos de mercado efectivos y aprender de la experiencia mediante procesos de documentación y sistematización.

Una de estas aplicaciones, que benefició a más de 7000 familias pobres del área rural de Nicaragua entre el año 2007 y el 2012 es el Proyecto “Alianza para la Creación de Oportunidades de Desarrollo Rural a través de Relaciones Agroempresariales” (ACORDAR, por sus siglas en inglés), que fue financiado por la Agencia de Estados Unidos para el Desarrollo Internacional (USAID, por sus siglas en inglés) y ejecutado por un consorcio principal liderado por Catholic Relief Services (CRS); del que formaron parte socios como Lutheran World Relief (LWR), TechnoServe (TNS), Aldea Global, Latin American Financial Services (LAFISE), el Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT) y otros socios locales en la zona de implementación.

Cinco años de trabajo en campo, más de 52 millones de dólares invertidos, cerca de 200 organizaciones trabajando en alianza, 50 municipalidades cobijadas (un tercio de las municipalidades del País), 25 gobiernos locales que invirtieron más de 20 millones de dólares en el fortalecimiento de las cadenas de valor, 7711 familias productoras beneficiadas, 27.396 empleos permanentes generados, ingresos que se incrementaron en un 20%, 222.760 toneladas de alimentos producidos, más de 128 millones de dólares en ventas, más de 100 profesionales que aportaron su conocimiento y experiencia, y un sistema de monitoreo y evaluación fuerte y robusto que ha sido modelo para otras iniciativas, hacen de ACORDAR un proyecto sin precedentes en Nicaragua.


Créditos: Proyecto ACORDAR

Créditos: Proyecto ACORDAR

Por eso hoy, un año después de la culminación de esta experiencia y en ocasión del cierre del 2013, queremos compartir con nuestros lectores aquellos elementos que creemos pueden se les útiles en el desarrollo de nuevas iniciativas en el 2014.

 

Algunas apuestas de ACORDAR

Una de las principales apuestas del Proyecto ACORDAR fue trabajar con un enfoque de cadena de valor, el cual pone énfasis en el fortalecimiento de las relaciones entre distintos actores de la cadena, como mecanismo para enfrentar problemáticas y aprovechar oportunidades que de manera individual requerirían una mayor inversión de tiempo y de dinero.

A pesar de que el término cadena productiva describe una serie de eslabones enlazados entre sí, una verdadera articulación entre las personas y organizaciones de estos eslabones no es algo que se da de manera natural, sino por lo que hay que trabajar de manera consiente para aumentar los niveles de confianza y colaboración que sustentan las relaciones entre los actores. Esto es lo que busca una cadena de valor.

Por lo tanto, uno de los grandes desafíos para ACORDAR fue diseñar y ejecutar los mecanismos que permitieran lograr esta articulación de actores para la competitividad de las cadenas de mayor relevancia en las regiones donde se implementaría el Proyecto. Frente a este desafío, LFM aportó gran parte de las herramientas metodológicas[1] y los elementos conceptuales para conducir tres cadenas productivas priorizadas por ACORDAR (frijol, café y raíces y tubérculos) hacia cadenas de valor, involucrando a los sectores público y privado.

La propuesta de LFM fue apalancar todos los esfuerzos que se iban a realizar con las cadenas a través de dos mecanismos: las Comisiones Técnicas y las Comisiones de Gobernanza. Las primeras, como equipos gerenciales –uno por cada cadena– conformados por técnicos de las organizaciones socias del consorcio ejecutor, que estuvieron encargadas de impulsar las acciones y articular los esfuerzos de los distintos actores involucrados en el proceso. Las segundas, como grupos representativos de los actores de las cadenas, encargados de promover y gestionar las demandas más estratégicas de cada una de ellas ante instancias públicas y privadas, a nivel nacional e internacional.

La herramienta a través de la cual se articularon las acciones de las Comisiones Técnicas con las de las Comisiones de Gobernanza fue la Estrategia de Competitividad , un documento que recopila los principales resultados de varios ejercicios de análisis y planeación que cada Comisión Técnica realizó con la participación de diversos actores de su correspondiente cadena (como mapeos de la cadena, árboles de problemas, y la construcción de un camino lógico) para planificar las actividades a corto, mediano y largo plazo que ejecutarían ambos tipos de comisiones para combatir las problemáticas o aprovechar las oportunidades identificadas en conjunto.

Todo este proceso de construcción de las cadenas de valor fue rescatado a través de un proceso de sistematización que se desarrolló al finalizar la primera fase de ACORDAR, entre febrero y mayo de 2010, durante el cual las Comisiones Técnicas sistematizaron sus propias iniciativas y produjeron 3 documentos [ver la guía metodológica aplicada para la sistematización] en los que rescatan sus experiencias y aprendizajes, y 5 historias de cambio [ver la guía para la elaboración de estas historias] que muestran evidencias de los impactos logrados en campo.  Además, se realizó un video que recoge los principales resultados de estos 8 productos y se documentaron 10 casos de innovación.

Otras apuestas de ACORDAR fueron:

  • El diseño conceptual y la construcción de un Fondo de innovación, que financió 16 propuestas por un valor de 875.075 dólares (US$305.579 de fondos de USAID y el resto, contrapartida de las empresas cooperativas), y buscó crear oportunidades de negocios para que las empresas cooperativas y otras pymes, en alianza con el sector privado y público, incrementaran su competitividad y apoyaran a los pequeños agricultores para acceder a insumos, equipos, tecnología y otros servicios que contribuyeran a aumentar la competitividad de las cadenas de valor y los ingresos de los pequeños productores y productoras.
  • El desarrollo de una guía de apoyo para el diseño, la prueba y la evaluación de modelos empresariales incluyentes (que más adelante y a través de otras iniciativas de LFM se consolidó como la Metodología LINK), como instrumento para aplicar con cada uno de los proyectos financiados por el Fondo de Innovación.
  • La aplicación al interior de cada cadena de una metodología para la innovación incluyente, denominada Gestores de Innovación en Agroindustria Rural (GIAR), que favorece la participación activa de los distintos actores de la cadena en la selección de tecnologías y la implementación de otras innovaciones, e integra también a los oferentes de tecnología.
  • El fortalecimiento de las Comisiones Técnicas y de Gobernanza a través de talleres teórico-prácticos sobre negocios empresariales incluyentes, el rol del municipio en la promoción y el apoyo de procesos de desarrollo empresarial incluyente, y los efectos de las políticas públicas y privadas en las dinámicas de las cadenas.
  • La gestión ante empresarios nicaragüenses para empezar a cultivar en el País un ambiente favorable para el desarrollo de modelos de negocios incluyentes en los que todos los actores ganen y se articulen de manera interdependiente.
  • La sistematización final de ACORDAR, que dejó como resultado 12 informes maestros donde se rescata la experiencia de 5 cadenas de valor (frijol, café, raíces y tubérculos, hortalizas y cacao), la experiencia del componente de Desarrollo Empresarial Rural, 2 experiencias de la temática transversal de municipalismo y 4 experiencias de género.

 

Algunas lecciones aprendidas

ACORDAR dejó grandes aprendizajes y hallazgos… como lo clave que es el rol de las Comisiones de Gobernanza para generar un ambiente habilitador a nivel nacional, y la necesidad de reforzar una capacidad colectiva de generación de evidencias y aprendizaje que permita ir más allá de una buena recolección de datos para el monitoreo y la evaluación, hasta llegar a la elaboración de productos de fácil ‘digestión’ para los diferentes niveles de usuarios, que contribuyan a la toma de decisiones públicas y privadas que faciliten el uso de mecanismos de mercado para reducir la pobreza.

Créditos: Proyecto ACORDAR

Créditos: Proyecto ACORDAR

Por otra parte, el modelo conceptual planteado por LFM para ACORDAR, que constaba de tres elementos centrales (productores capaces de ser buenos socios empresariales, compradores dispuestos y un ambiente habilitador), logró funcionar en la mayoría de las cadenas atendidas por el proyecto. Específicamente se pueden resaltar las siguientes lecciones con base en este concepto:

  • El fortalecimiento empresarial es altamente importante para lograr la articulación de productores de pequeña escala y pobres a mercados. Sin embargo, no es suficiente organizar cooperativas si no se invierten esfuerzos y fondos en el desarrollo de sus capacidades para funcionar de manera eficiente y efectiva en el campo empresarial, en conexión con acceso a tecnologías adecuadas de producción. ACORDAR mostró la importancia de equilibrar estos enfoques mediante el fortalecimiento de cooperativas y el desarrollo de diversos modelos de acceso a tecnología, desde su provisión directa hasta el establecimiento de alianzas con proveedores. Muchas veces los proyectos de desarrollo apuestan o al fortalecimiento empresarial (entendido como capacidades de las cooperativas) o a la tecnología. ACORDAR mostró la importancia de hacer ambas cosas pero de manera coordinada.
  • Existen muchos caminos para lograr cambiar las actitudes y prácticas de las empresas compradoras. Al inicio de la segunda fase de ACORDAR, CIAT planteó el uso de una metodología enfocada en el modelo empresarial de las empresas compradoras, sin que esta tuviera el alcance y la utilización esperados. Sin embargo, ACORDAR sí logró incidir directamente en las prácticas empresariales de algunas empresas claves mediante el trabajo de las comisiones de las cadenas. El hecho de establecer, facilitar y mantener un espacio de diálogo entre diversos actores de la cadena, permitió visualizar y discutir prácticas comerciales no adecuadas tanto del sector privado como por parte del Estado. Hacia el futuro, una mezcla de espacios de acción colectiva y métodos más precisos a nivel de las empresas, puede ser una buena manera de incidir en el cambio de prácticas comerciales basadas en rentas adicionales a costa de otros, hacia modelos de desarrollo empresarial moderno donde se entiende que los actores de las cadenas son interdependientes.
  • De igual manera, existen múltiples formas de lograr la consolidación de un ambiente habilitador. ACORDAR logro avanzar rápidamente en este campo en dos frentes. Primero, el trabajo arduo a nivel de 25 municipalidades permitió articular inversiones importantes en infraestructura básica (US$20.373.889 invertidos por los gobiernos locales en vías, sistemas de agua y energía) que aumentaban la competitividad de las cooperativas activas en el territorio. Esto se logró mediante el fortalecimiento de las cooperativas como actores de desarrollo local facilitando su participación en procesos de discusión y asignación de presupuestos municipales. Es altamente probable que este espacio pueda ser aprovechado hacia el futuro, ya que tanto las cooperativas como las alcaldías tienen claridad sobre los procesos a seguir y los logros generados. Segundo, el rol de las comisiones de cadena para generar un ambiente habilitador a nivel nacional fue clave. Además de incidir en la toma de decisiones empresariales descrito anteriormente, estos espacios siguen facilitando una buena discusión estratégica con el Estado sobre el desarrollo de las cadenas y sus necesidades de apoyo. Desde luego, los procesos a nivel nacional son complicados ya que existen múltiples agendas e intereses. A pesar de esto, parece ser que las comisiones han propiciado una conversación más profunda y constante que espacios anteriores, a tal punto que la comisión de frijol, por ejemplo, ha logrado consolidarse como espacio clave en la cadena a nivel nacional.

 

Puede consultar aquí la sistematización preliminar del Proyecto ACORDAR, realizada en el 2010. En el 2014 compartiremos a través de este blog los productos finales de la sistematización de ACORDAR, realizada en el 2012.

Para mayor información sobre esta experiencia, por favor contacte a Mark Lundy (m.lundy@cgiar.org)



[1] Algunas de las herramientas metodológicas aportadas por el CIAT pueden consultarse en:

i)    Documento Estratégico: Un Enfoque Participativo, Basado en el Área, hacia el Desarrollo Agroempresarial Rural [En inglés: http://ciat-library.ciat.cgiar.org:8080/jspui/bitstream/123456789/1120/2/Good_Practice_Guide_1.pdf];

ii)   Manual para el Desarrollo de Asociaciones Colaborativas, Evaluación de los Recursos Locales y Planificación Conjunta, Utilizando un Enfoque Participativo [En inglés: http://ciat-library.ciat.cgiar.org:8080/jspui/bitstream/123456789/1128/2/Good_Practice_Guide_2.pdf] [En español: http://ciat-library.ciat.cgiar.org:8080/jspui/bitstream/123456789/6591/1/desarrollo_grupos_trabajo_procesos_desarrollo_empresarial_rural.pdf]

iii) Identificación de Oportunidades de Mercado para Pequeños Productores Rurales [En inglés: http://ciat-library.ciat.cgiar.org:8080/jspui/bitstream/123456789/1122/2/Good_Practice_Guide_3.pdf] [En español: http://ciat-library.ciat.cgiar.org:8080/jspui/bitstream/123456789/1032/1/Identificacion_evaluacion_oportunidades_mercado_pequenos_productores_rurales.pdf];

iv) Análisis Participativo de Cadenas de Mercado para Pequeños Productores [En inglés: http://ciat-library.ciat.cgiar.org:8080/jspui/bitstream/123456789/1127/2/Good_Practice_Guide_4.pdf] [En español: http://ciat-library.ciat.cgiar.org:8080/jspui/bitstream/123456789/1093/1/Diseno_estrategias_aumentar_competitividad_cadenas_productivas.pdf].

 



Desempeño y Sostenibilidad de las Alianzas Productivas: Un Análisis Macro de un Programa de Acceso a Mercados

Dec 16th, 2013 | By

¿Sabía usted que una “alianza productiva” es un instrumento de política de desarrollo rural que ayuda a los campesinos a ser más competitivos?

¿Cómo se establece una alianza productiva? Se entrega un subsidio a los pequeños productores con el objetivo de que superen sus limitaciones productivas y gerenciales. Además, se les brinda acompañamiento, y al final se desarrolla un modelo de desarrollo organizativo y empresarial que vincula a los productores con los mercados a través de un acuerdo de compra y venta con un aliado comercial, que cuenta con una propuesta productiva rentable y sostenible y competitiva para ambas partes.

¿Le interesaría saber si en efecto este tipo de programas públicos funcionan?  En otras palabras, ¿valdrá la pena fomentar alianzas productivas entre productores de pequeña y media escala como una estrategia efectiva para aumentar la competitividad sectorial, y más aún en Colombia bajo un posible escenario de paz?

Además, ¿son útiles estos programas de acceso a mercados como vehículos de inclusión social con énfasis especial en poblaciones históricamente marginadas?

A nosotros sí. En Junio de 2013 la unidad de Linking Farmers to Markets (LFM) de DAPA-CIAT asumió el reto de contestar estas complejas preguntas, y ahora lidera una investigación llamada “Proyecto de Apoyo a Alianzas Productivas (PAAP) y Poblaciones Marginadas en Colombia: Buscando evidencias empíricas de los impactos de programas de acceso a mercado”, la cual cuenta con el apoyo de la Fundación Ford.

En Colombia, el Proyecto de Apoyo a Alianzas Productivas[1] (PAAP) viene implementándose por parte del Ministerio de Agricultura y Desarrollo Rural (MADR) desde 2002, y al momento ha evolucionado desde un programa financiado netamente por el Banco Mundial (mediante préstamos al gobierno de Colombia) hacia casi una política pública, en donde el mismo MADR decide invertir recursos públicos sustanciales para su ampliación. Este tránsito, desde un proyecto especial con fecha de inicio y fecha de cierre hacía un programa estatal de larga duración, es el resultado de un proceso interesante de consolidación conceptual, metodológica y operacional, liderado por el mismo equipo del MADR.

Gráfico 1: UNA ALIANZA PRODUCTIVA ES UNA PROPUESTA DE VALOR TANTO PARA LOS CAMPESINOS COMO PARA LOS COMPRADORES

   Untitled

 El equipo de investigadores de LFM-DAPA CIAT ingeniosamente ha dividido el análisis del PAAP, como política pública, en tres niveles de estudio, a saber: análisis macro, meso y micro (Gráfico 2).

Gráfico 2: LOS TRES COMPONENTES DEL PROYECTO DE APOYO A ALIANZAS PRODUCTIVAS (PAAP) Y POBLACIONES MARGINADAS EN COLOMBIA

Untitled

 En primer lugar, se busca definir claramente su alcance e identificar relaciones entre las características de las alianzas y su grado de desempeño y sostenibilidad (Gráfico 3).

Gráfico 3: EVALUACIÓN DEL DESEMPEÑO DE UNA AP

 Add MediaUntitled

En segundo lugar, al definir grupos representativos de alianzas identificadas en el trabajo macro, se indaga por medio de la metodología LINK sobre el modelo empresarial implementado, su grado de inclusión, los cambios más significativos identificados por los participantes y las lecciones aprendidas (Gráfico 4).

Gráfico 4: METODOLOGÍA LINK

Untitled

Tercero, se toma el hogar campesino como unidad de análisis incluyendo tanto familias participantes como no participantes del PAAP, para caracterizar el hogar, y así, medir cambios en ingresos, oportunidades, empleo, conocimientos, seguridad alimentaria, vulnerabilidad y la probabilidad de estar o no en situación de pobreza o pobreza extrema.

El 6 de diciembre 2013 miembros de los equipos de LFM e Impacto de DAPA se dieron cita con especialistas agrícolas del Banco Mundial, y funcionarios del Equipo Implementador de Políticas (EIP) del PAAP-MADR para presentar los primeros resultados de esta novedosa investigación (Gráfico 5).

Gráfico 5: REVISIÓN DE RESULTADOS

Untitled

Durante el encuentro Banco Mundial-PAAP-LFM-DAPA se socializó la primera parte del análisis macro que contiene la construcción de un índice de desempeño de las alianzas del PAAP a partir de criterios como competitividad, eficiencia de los negocios y sostenibilidad. Igualmente, a partir de los resultados arrojados por el índice se eligieron los casos de estudio para implementar la metodología LINK.

En los próximos meses se continuará con la segunda parte del estudio macro que trata sobre el análisis de sostenibilidad de una alianza productiva. Para ello se utilizará un modelo de duración o de supervivencia. En este caso, se busca identificar aquellas características que determinan la probabilidad de que una Alianza Productiva sea sostenible en el tiempo para un mejor diseño  de la política pública (Gráfico 6).

Gráfico 6: MODELO DE DURACIÓN PARA PROYECTO PAAP

Untitled También se dará inicio al componente meso que busca por medio de la metodología LINK analizar las relaciones empresariales y los modelos de negocios de las alianzas productivas.

Por:

Gypsy Bocanegra O. Economista e Investigadora Visitante de la Universidad Icesi. Trabaja en el tema Vinculación de los  Agricultores a los Mercados, Área de Investigación en Análisis de Políticas (DAPA, por sus siglas en inglés) del CIAT.

Rafael Isidro Parra-Peña S. Economista y Analista de Políticas Públicas. Trabaja en el tema Vinculación de los  Agricultores a los Mercados, Área de Investigación en Análisis de Políticas (DAPA, por sus siglas en inglés) del CIAT.


[1] De aquí en adelante se refiere al Programa de Apoyo a Alianzas Productivas como el PAAP o Alianzas Productivas.



Carne y leche: un encuentro con el sector ganadero en Nicaragua

Dec 6th, 2013 | By

Dentro del marco del programa de investigación del CGIAR sobre Ganadería y Pesca, el equipo del CIAT-Nicaragua organizó el Taller de rutas de impacto y planificación sobre cadenas de valor de ganadería de doble propósito en Nicaragua.

Taller LaF1

El Consorcio de Centros Internacionales de Investigación Agrícola del CGIAR es un conjunto de 15 centros de investigación que colaboran entre sí para enfrentar los complejos problemas del desarrollo agrícola a nivel mundial. El Consorcio está dedicado a generar y diseminar conocimientos, tecnologías y políticas para el desarrollo agrícola a través de 16 Programas de Investigación del CGIAR (CRP, por sus siglas en inglés).

Del 5 al 9 de agosto de 2013 una amplia gama de actores de distintos niveles de la cadena de valor participó en este intercambio, con el objetivo de definir las rutas de impacto de este programa de investigación en el contexto del país, identificar sinergías con los socios de implementación y otros programas de investigación del CGIAR y desarrollar un marco inicial para su implementación en Nicaragua.

Entre los participantes se encontraron representantes de asociaciones de pequeños productores, organizaciones de extensión nacionales e internacionales, instituciones nacionales de investigación agrícola, universidades, gobierno y sector privado.

Taller LaF2Conociendo el contexto actual

Los participantes realizaron una evaluación inicial del estado actual de la cadena de valor, identificando iniciativas de desarrollo existentes y los principales obstáculos que limitan el crecimiento en cada nivel. Entre las actividades en curso para fomentar la producción ganadera se destacó el plan de desarrollo del sector ganadero del gobierno nicaragüense.

Una de las principales metas de este plan es preservar la integridad de los recursos naturales paralelamente a la intensificación de la productividad del ganado. Asimismo, se destacó la necesidad de mejorar las oportunidades de mercado y fortalecer políticas a favor de los pequeños ganaderos.

Partiendo de estos puntos de convergencia entre la propuesta del programa y las iniciativas existentes en el país, los participantes detallaron las necesidades más urgentes para impulsar el desarrollo en cada uno de los niveles de la cadena de valor.

Manejo de recursos y conocimiento

VisitaCampo4Los participantes enfatizaron la importancia de involucrar a las mujeres y jóvenes de la región en las intervenciones del programa, considerando en particular la transferencia de conocimientos y el relevo generacional en el proceso de toma de decisiones y manejo de recursos.

Existe también la necesidad de analizar los sistemas y conocimientos locales para abordar los servicios de asistencia técnica partiendo desde la comprensión de los procesos de toma de decisiones de los productores. Por su parte, los productores necesitan observar que los cambios recomendados durante las capacitaciones son efectivos, lo que requiere un seguimiento continuo a las intervenciones del programa.

Frenar la expansión de la frontera agrícola

Una de las consecuencias de las prácticas ineficientes de manejo de fincas ha sido la degradación de los recursos naturales, lo que ha obligado a muchos productores a migrar en busca de tierras adecuadas para la producción ganadera. Se consideró esencial abordar la expansión horizontal de la frontera agrícola debido al deterioro de los suelos, a fin de detener estos patrones migratorios y prevenir el círculo vicioso de migración y degradación, así como restaurar los recursos naturales, y ayudar a los pequeños productores a intensificar su producción a través del manejo sostenible de sus recursos.

Limitaciones a nivel de mercado

VisitaCampo3

El acceso limitado a la asistencia técnica, el suministro deficiente de insumos, el pobre acceso a servicios financieros, redes de distribución inadecuadas y una falta de regulación del procesamiento artesanal son factores principales que limitan el potencial comercial de los productos desde distintos niveles de la cadena.

Los participantes mencionaron la necesidad de fortalecer la educación a nivel del consumidor, promoviendo el consumo de alimentos de origen animal para disminuir la brecha nutricional y aumentar la demanda de los mercados locales. La regulación y estandarización durante la fase de procesamiento también es necesaria para impulsar la comercialización e ingresar a los mercados internacionales con estándares de calidad más estrictos.

Socios y actividades de seguimiento

VisitaCampo1Entre las principales actividades de seguimiento que se definieron para la implementación del programa en Nicaragua se encuentran la recolección inicial de datos, un análisis situacional y el desarrollo de herramientas de monitoreo y evaluación. Los ejes de desarrollo a explorar incluyen genética y reproducción animal, forrajes y alimentación del ganado, nutrición humana y género.

Partiendo del análisis situacional se realizarán análisis de tendencias para evaluar escenarios de mercado, implicaciones para la competitividad del sector, impacto ambiental y desarrollo de sistemas desde las prácticas de manejo de fincas hasta los retos y oportunidades de mercado.



Convocatoria para estudiantes de Maestría

Nov 27th, 2013 | By

Buscamos estudiantes de maestría gestores de evidencia empírica.

Actualmente, existe una iniciativa conjunta entre el MADR-PAAP y el CIAT que busca documentar y analizar el funcionamiento y los resultados del Programa de Apoyo a las Alianzas Productivas (PAAP), una apuesta del Ministerio de Agricultura y Desarrollo Rural (MADR) que viene implementándose desde 2002 con el fin de incrementar la competitividad y el desarrollo empresarial de las comunidades rurales, de manera sostenible a través de alianzas productivas entre grupos organizados de pequeños productores y comercializadores o transformadores de su producto.

El CIAT, en su papel de coordinador-ejecutor, documentará y analizará en varios niveles el funcionamiento y los resultados del PAAP como motor de procesos de desarrollo económico y social incluyentes con poblaciones vulnerables. Se identificarán con base en los criterios desarrollados en el marco del proyecto algunas alianzas como unidad de análisis, y se indagará por medio de talleres, entrevistas semiestructuradas y encuestas, sobre el modelo empresarial implementado en cada una de esas alianzas, además de analizar el grado de inclusión, los cambios más significativos y las lecciones aprendidas. Igualmente, se realizará una caracterización socioeconómica del hogar de los participantes de las alianzas seleccionadas.

Para recopilar la información mencionada, el MADR-PAAP y el CIAT buscan diez estudiantes de maestría para la posición de Gestor de Evidencia Empírica, quienes serán responsables de aplicar en campo un kit de herramientas cualitativas y cuantitativas (entre ellas las entrevistas semi-estructuradas y encuestas) brindado por las áreas de Vinculando Productores al Mercado y Evaluación de Impacto del CIAT y, posteriormente, documentar un estudio de caso con los resultados obtenidos y la información secundaria recopilada.
Los(as) Gestores de evidencia empírica van a trabajar en equipos de dos y van a estar basados la mayoría del tiempo en las zonas rurales donde se encuentran los casos de estudio, que incluyen: Arauca, Bolívar, Caldas, Caquetá, Cauca, Nariño, Putumayo y Sucre.

Se prefieren personas con origen y/o residencia en la zona de trabajo.

Disponibilidad de tiempo: De Enero a Junio de 2014

Perfil del aspirante

  • Estudiante de maestría en economía, administración de empresas, sociología, comunicación social, agronomía, agroindustria o disciplinas afines.
  • Interés en temas de agricultura y desarrollo empresarial.
  • Experiencia de trabajo con actores rurales (productores, compradores, ONG, entre otros).
  • Experiencia en la aplicación de métodos de investigación social como entrevistas semi –estructurada, encuestas y grupos focales.
  • Excelente redacción, capacidad de análisis y síntesis.
  • Manejo de paquete Office.
  • Disposición para aprender e involucrarse en temas nuevos.
  • Disponibilidad para viajar y realizar trabajo en campo.
  • Facilidad para trabajar en equipo y comprometerse con propósitos grupales.
  • Capacidad de trabajar bajo presión de tiempo.
  • Ser muy cumplido con las fechas de entrega.
  • Ser capaz de trabajar de forma autónoma.

Roles y Responsabilidades

  • Revisión de antecedentes del caso de estudio.
  • Aprender en teoría y práctica sobre herramientas participativas para analizar modelos de negocios como la Metodología LINK1.
  • Coordinar fechas de entrevista con las personas clave del estudio de caso, según el cronograma.
  • Organizar viajes a campo.
  • Realizar entrevistas semi – estructuradas y encuestas
  • Planificar, organizar y manejar grupos focales.
  • Establecer comunicación permanente con el equipo del MADR-PAAP y CIAT.
  • Entregar los datos recopilados del estudio de caso de manera “cruda” y de forma organizada a través de un informe final sobre el trabajo realizado, que también deberá incluir lecciones aprendidas a través de la experiencia en campo y además de los resultados sistematizados de las encuestas (nivel micro).

Términos de contratación
El estudiante recibirá un estipendio mensual. Los viáticos, la alimentación en los viajes y los gastos administrativos para la realización de talleres (materiales, impresiones, alquiler del espacio, entre otros), serán cubiertos aparte por el proyecto.
Aplicaciones
Las aplicaciones deben enviarse vía e-mail a Jhon Jairo Hurtado j.hurtado@cgiar.org
Fecha de cierre: 11 de diciembre de 2013



Cultivating change in chains

Nov 18th, 2013 | By

Public policy stakeholders from across Latin America took a large first step towards designing effective strategies for agriculture supply chains during a 3-day workshop held last week in Bogotá. As part of an ongoing project led by CIAT experts on Linking Farmers to Markets, international representatives from government ministries, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the Ford Foundation, NGOs, and the private sector assembled to share experiences on what works and does not work in agriculture supply chain policy.

The event was made possible by support from the Ford Foundation and Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (IICA).

participantes

Workshop participants at IICA in Bogotá

After 3 days of discussions, it was clear that designing public policies that balance productivity, social inclusion, and sustainability is not a simple matter. The conflicting priorities of various sectors, and even of various ministries in the same government, further muddle an already complex process.

Rafael Isidro Parra-Peña, a public policy analyst at CIAT, said participants agreed that “gathering for stimulating discussions on an important topic – which we rarely have an opportunity to do – was extremely useful.”

Parra-Peña presents a case study on tomato supply chains in the Boyacá region of Colombia

Parra-Peña presents a case study on tomato supply chains in the Boyacá region of Colombia

Public policies play a fundamental role in determining the productive capacity of national economies. It is typically assumed that making agriculture more competitive leads to rural poverty alleviation. However, strategies aiming to increase competitiveness often fail to include the most marginalized people, and do not consider environmental sustainability or long-term impact.

“There’s a great deal of growth in Latin America, but it is focused in the urban centers, with rural areas lagging behind,” said Jean Paul Lacoste , senior program officer at the Ford Foundation, in his opening speech. “If we want to truly diminish rural poverty, we need to consider marginalized populations – including women – while improving or creating new public policies which promote inclusive value chains.” Rural smallholders face a number of disadvantages including access to markets, financial services, transportation, land acquisition, and agricultural extension.

Lacoste stressed the importance of the event: “Thus far, there has been very little knowledge sharing between sectors, despite a plethora of useful lessons learned in countries throughout the region.”

Participants exchanged best practices, discussed knowledge gaps, and identified opportunities for improved agriculture supply chain policy.

“There is a lack of a common framework to compare country experiences,” said Javier Chaud Moltedo from the Ministry of Agriculture in Chile. He added, though, that he gained “useful knowledge from other nations to share in Chile.”

Javier Chaud Moltedo poses a question during the workshop

Javier Chaud Moltedo poses a question during the workshop

Matthias Jaeger, marketing expert at Bioversity International, highlighted a key challenge to designing effective public policies: “Modern value chains today need to deliver on income generation, food and nutrition security, and climate resilience. We don’t have the tools to measure the effectiveness of value chains.” A number of participants echoed this, emphasizing the need for methods to quantify impact at different levels. “How can we make policy recommendations and prioritize nutritious and market-valuable crops without adequate data? This is a niche CGIAR centers can fill by developing and disseminating improved measurement and evaluation methods,” added Jaeger.

“Nobody has a complete solution of how to achieve a balance between productivity, social inclusion, and sustainability, but collectively we have taken a big first step towards defining an agenda to make more effective public policies. We need to continue the momentum forged here,” concluded Mark Lundy, who leads CIAT research on Linking Farmers to Markets.

Written by Melissa Reichwage.

Related links:

Slideshare: With presentations from the workshop

Workshop press release

Ford Foundation and CIAT: An enduring partnership supporting pro-poor policies

Photos: Melissa Reichwage (CIAT)



Cultivando cambio en cadenas

Nov 18th, 2013 | By

Expertos en políticas públicas de América Latina dieron un primer gran paso hacia el diseño de estrategias efectivas para el desarrollo de cadenas productivas, durante un taller de tres días realizado la semana pasada en Bogotá. Como parte de un proyecto en curso dirigido por expertos en vinculación de agricultores a los mercados del CIAT, representantes internacionales de ministerios, la Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Alimentación y la Agricultura (FAO), la Fundación Ford, ONGs y el sector privado, quienes  se reunieron para compartir experiencias sobre lo que funciona y lo que no funciona en la política agrícola de las cadenas de suministros.

El evento fue realizado gracias al apoyo de la Fundación Ford y del Instituto Interamericano de Cooperación para la Agricultura (IICA).

Participantes del Taller en instalaciones del IICA en Bogotá

Participantes del Taller en instalaciones del IICA en Bogotá

Después de 3 días de presentaciones y debates, quedó claro que no es una cuestión sencilla diseñar políticas públicas que equilibren, al mismo tiempo, productividad, inclusión social y sostenibilidad. Además, las prioridades contradictorias de varios sectores, e incluso de varios ministerios en un mismo gobierno, hacen que un proceso que es en sí complejo lo sea aún más.

Rafael Isidro Parra-Peña, economista y analista de políticas públicas del CIAT, mencionó que “reunirse para estimular debates sobre un tema importante – para los que raramente se tiene la oportunidad – fue muy útil.”

Parra-Peña presenta un caso de estudio sobre la cadena productiva de tomate en Boyacá, Colombia

Parra-Peña presenta un caso de estudio sobre la cadena productiva de tomate en Boyacá, Colombia

Las políticas públicas juegan un papel fundamental en la determinación de la capacidad productiva de las economías nacionales. Se asume, por lo general, que promover la competitividad del sector agrícola llevará a la disminución de la pobreza. Sin embargo, las estrategias encaminadas a aumentar la competitividad, a menudo, no incluyen a las personas marginadas y tampoco tienen en cuenta la sostenibilidad del medio ambiente o el impacto a largo plazo.

“Hay un gran crecimiento en América Latina, pero se concentra en los centros urbanos, dejando atrás las áreas rurales” dijo Jean Paul Lacoste, coordinador senior de la Fundación Ford para la Región Andina y el Cono Sur, en su discurso de apertura. “Si queremos reducir verdaderamente la pobreza rural, es necesario considerar las poblaciones marginadas –incluyendo las mujeres- y, al mismo tiempo, mejorar o crear nuevas políticas públicas que promuevan cadenas de valor inclusivas.” Los pequeños productores se enfrentan a una serie de desventajas que incluyen: el acceso a los mercados, los servicios financieros, el transporte, la adquisición de tierras y la extensión agrícola.

Lacoste hizo hincapié en la importancia del evento: “Hasta ahora, ha habido muy poco intercambio de conocimientos entre sectores, a pesar de una gran cantidad de útiles lecciones aprendidas en distintos países de la región.”

Los participantes intercambiaron ideas sobre mejores prácticas, discutieron las brechas de conocimiento, e identificaron oportunidades para mejorar la política de cadenas productivas.

“Falta un marco de referencia común que permita comparar las experiencias de los países”, dijo Javier Chaud Moltedo del Ministerio de Agricultura de Chile.

Javier Chaud Moltedo hace una pregunta durante el taller

Javier Chaud Moltedo hace una pregunta durante el taller

Matthias Jaeger, experto en marketing de Bioversity International, destacó un desafío clave para el diseño de políticas públicas eficaces: “Las cadenas de valor modernas deben cumplir con la generación de ingresos, la seguridad alimentaria y nutricional, y la adaptación al cambio climático. No contamos aún con las herramientas para medir la eficacia de las cadenas de valor.” Algunos de los participantes coincidieron con esto, enfatizando en la necesidad de métodos para cuantificar el impacto en distintos niveles. “¿Cómo podemos hacer recomendaciones de política y dar prioridad a cultivos alimenticios valiosos tanto para la nutrición como para el mercado sin datos adecuados? Este es un asunto que los centros del CGIAR pueden tratar al desarrollar y difundir mejores métodos de medición y evaluación”, añadió Jaeger.

“Nadie tiene la solución sobre cómo lograr un equilibrio entre la productividad, la inclusión social y la sostenibilidad, pero en conjunto hemos dado un primer paso hacia la definición de una agenda para hacer políticas públicas que sean más eficaces. Tenemos que continuar con el impulso forjado aquí,” concluyó Mark Lundy, quien lidera la investigación del CIAT sobre la vinculación de los agricultores a los mercados.

Escrito por Melissa Reichwage.

Vínculos relacionados:

Slideshare: Con presentaciones del taller

Workshop press release

Ford Foundation and CIAT: An enduring partnership supporting pro-poor policies

Fotos: Melissa Reichwage (CIAT)